Ancient City of Aleppo (1986)
Syria

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Located at the crossroads of several trade routes from the 2nd millennium B.C., Aleppo was ruled successively by the Hittites, Assyrians, Arabs, Mongols, Mamelukes and Ottomans. 

The 13th-century citadel, 12th-century Great Mosque and various 17th-century madrasas, palaces, caravanserais and hammams all form part of the city's cohesive, unique urban fabric, now threatened by overpopulation. 

  • Syria 1961. The Qalb Lozah Church in Aleppo. The church is in Byzantine style, and has over time served both Muslim and Christian communities. 

Syria 1961. Qalb Lozah Church in Aleppo.

Halab or Aleppo (ancient Beroea), is a city in northern Syria, the capital of Halab Governorate. It lies on a plateau 427 m (1400 ft) high, midway between the Mediterranean Sea and the Euphrates River. 

Syria 1955. The Modern Aqueduct of Aleppo, bringing water from the Euphrates to Northern Syria.

The second largest city of Syria, Aleppo is an agricultural trading center and has factories producing carpets; silk, cotton, and wool textiles; silverware and gold ware; leather goods; and embroidery. Aleppo consists of an old and a new town; the former is enclosed within a wall dating from medieval times. 
  • Syria 1955. The Modern Aqueduct of Aleppo, bringing water from the Euphrates to Northern Syria. The stamp exists in two face values, and may also be found imperf. 

Among the most important buildings are the modern citadel, surrounded by a moat and standing on a hill 61 m (200 ft) high, and the Mosque of Zacharias, said to contain the tomb of Saint John the Baptist's father. 

Syria 1929. View of the Citadel of Aleppo. Stamp #1.

Syria 1929. View of the Citadel of Aleppo. Stamp #2.

Also in Aleppo are a number of European schools and Christian churches and missions. The University of Aleppo was founded in 1960. The city is connected by rail with Damascus, and with Beirut, and by caravan route with Iraq and parts of Kurdistan. In the 3rd century AD, Aleppo became the greatest center of trade between Europe and lands farther east. The history of the city, which was settled by the Hittites before 1000 BC, parallels that of Syria. 

Sources and links:

Other World Cultural Heritage Properties in Syria (on this web site). For more information about the individual properties, please refer to the UNESCO-listing, Syria-section. 

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Revised 29 jul 2006  
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