Skellig Michael (1996)
Ireland

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This monastic complex, perched since about the 7th century on the steep sides of the rocky island of Skellig Michael, some 12 km off the coast of south-west Ireland, illustrates the very spartan existence of the first Irish Christians. Since the extreme remoteness of Skellig Michael has until recently discouraged visitors, the site is exceptionally well preserved. 

Ireland has seemingly not issued any postage stamps related to this property, so you are instead invited to view some beautiful photographs from the area

Ireland 1997. Northern Gannet [Morus Bassanus].

The Skellig Islands, Skellig Michael and Small Skellig, stand aloof in the Atlantic Ocean some 12 km southwest of Valentia Island, County Kerry. From any angle, or from any vantage point on the nearby Ring of Kerry, they are spectacular pinnacles, which have magnetised viewers throughout all history – and beyond.

These Skellig islands are world-famous, each in its own right: Skellig Michael is known throughout the world of archaeology as the site of a well-preserved monastic outpost of the Early Christian period; Small Skellig is equally renowned in matters of ornithology as the home of some 27,000 pairs of gannets – the second largest colony of such seabirds in the world

  • Ireland 1997. Northern Gannet [Morus Bassanus]. 

A wisp of cloud often adorning the peaks of these pinnacles creates a volcanic impression! But there is nothing volcanic about these Skelligs rocks; they are created of the same 350–million-year-old Devonian Sandstone that runs right through the backbone of Kerry - from the county’s south-western headlands to the shores of Killarney's lakes. 

Sources and links: 

Other World Heritage Sites in Ireland (on this web site). Please refer to the UNESCO-listing, Ireland section, for further information. 

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Revised 01 aug 2006  
Copyright © 1999 Heindorffhus 
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