Sangiran Early Man Site (1996)
Indonesia

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Excavations here from 1936 to 1941 led to the discovery of the first hominid fossil at this site. Later, 50 fossils of Meganthropus palaeo and Pithecanthropus erectus/Homo erectus were found – half of all the world's known hominid fossils. Inhabited for the past one and a half million years, Sangiran is one of the key sites for the understanding of human evolution. 

Indonesia 1989. Set of two stamps commemorating the centenary of the finding of the first hominid fossils. Stamp #1 of two. Indonesia 1989. Set of two stamps commemorating the centenary of the finding of the first hominid fossils. Stamp #2 of two.

Evidence at Sangiran Java, Indonesia of a Mojokerto child suggests Homo Erectus existed in this region supporting the contention that Homo Sapiens may have evolved independent of African Homo Erectus.  About fifty other Homo Erectus fossils support this contention. It is noteworthy that Homo Erectus also first appeared about this time in Kenya, East Africa and the Hsihoutu site in China. To complicate matters Homo Erectus is discovered at Tbilisi, Georgia (Russia). The problem is that within 100,000 years Homo Erectus can and probably did travel to most places in the world. We tend to underestimate the mobility of people if they are motivated to travel. 

Sources and links:

Other World Heritage Sites in Indonesia (on this site). Inactive links are not described on postage stamps. Please refer to the UNESCO-listing, section Indonesia for further information about the individual properties. 

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Revised 26 dec 2006  
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