City of Quito (1978)
Ecuador

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Ecuador 1929. Air Post. The Cathedral of Quito.

Quito, the capital of Ecuador, was founded in the 16th century on the ruins of an Inca city and stands at an altitude of 2,850 m. Despite the 1917 earthquake, the city has the best-preserved, least altered historic centre in Latin America. 

The monasteries of San Francisco and Santo Domingo, and the Church and Jesuit College of La Compañía, with their rich interiors, are pure examples of the 'Baroque school of Quito', which is a fusion of Spanish, Italian, Moorish, Flemish and indigenous art. 

  • Ecuador 1929. Air Post. The Cathedral of Quito. 

Quito is the capital of Ecuador and of Pichincha Province. The city is picturesquely situated on the lower slopes of Pichincha volcano in a narrow, fertile valley of the Andes Mountains at an elevation of 2850 m (9350 ft) above sea level. Because of its elevation it has a pleasant, moderate climate despite being just south of the equator. Quito has little heavy industry. The city is linked with the Pacific Ocean by roads and a railroad (opened 1908), and is on the Pan-American Highway. 

Ecuador 1930. Scenery from Quito. Stamp #1 of two. Ecuador 1930. Scenery from Quito. Stamp #2 of two. Ecuador 1942. View of Quito.
Quito is the oldest South American capital and retains much of its colonial aspect. 

The city is laid out mainly according to a rectangular plan and has an expansive central plaza, many quiet parks and flower gardens, and numerous steep, narrow streets. 

The architecture of Quito is chiefly in the Spanish baroque style. Notable structures include a 17th-century cathedral and the churches of San Francisco, San Augustin, La Compañía, and Santo Domingo. 

  • Ecuador 2003. Commemorating Quito's 25th anniversary as World Cultural Heritage. Church and Convent of San Francisco.  

Ecuador 2003. Commemorating Quito's 25th anniversary as World Cultural Heritage. Church and Convent of San Francisco.

Ecuador 2003. Commemorating Quito's 25th anniversary as World Cultural Heritage.  Church of El Sagrario. Ecuador 2003. Commemorating Quito's 25th anniversary as World Cultural Heritage.  Church of La Compania de Jesus (Jesuit Institution). Ecuador 2003. Commemorating Quito's 25th anniversary as World Cultural Heritage.  Church of Santa Barbara.

Ecuador 1937. Atahualpa, The Last Inca.

The site of Quito was settled during the 1st millennium ad, and it became successively the fortified capital of several native groups, including the Quito. In 1487 the city was annexed by the Incas, and in 1534 it was captured by the Spanish conquistador Sebastián de Belalcázar, a lieutenant of Francisco Pizarro. 
  • Ecuador 1937. Atahualpa, The Last Inca. 

The Spanish made it the capital of the presidency of Quito. In 1822 the city was liberated by Antonio José de Sucre, a commander of the South American troops in their revolt against Spanish rule. Quito was Ecuador's chief economic center until the early 20th century, when it was displaced by Guayaquil. The city was damaged by several earthquakes in the 19th century. 

Sources and links: 

Other World Heritage Sites in the Ecuador (on this site). Please refer to the UNESCO-listing, Ecuador section, for further information on the individual properties. 

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Revised 03 aug 2006  
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