Tipasa (1982)
Algeria

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On the shores of the Mediterranean, Tipasa was an ancient Punic trading-post conquered by Rome and turned into a strategic base for the conquest of the kingdoms of Mauritania. 

Algeria 1955. Chenua Mountain and view of Tipasa. Algeria 1993. Aerial view of Tipasa.

It comprises a unique group of Phoenician, Roman, palaeochristian and Byzantine ruins alongside indigenous monuments such as the Kbor er Roumia, the great royal mausoleum of Mauritania. 

  • Algeria 1955. Chenua Mountain and view of Tipasa. 

  • Algeria 1993. Aerial view of Tipasa. 

The site was inscribed on the List of World Heritage in Danger in 2002. 

One the most interesting sites at Tipasa, is the mausoleum down at the sea side, built in the 5th century, where there are 14 places for sarchophagi. 

The Forum is well preserved, and is the oldest part of the ruin area. The museum is small but still full of valuable mosaics that were taken from the Basilica, and which sometimes dates back to 1st century AD. 

  • Algeria 1993. The Royal Mausoleum of Tipasa. 

Algeria 1993. The Royal Mausoleum of Tipasa.

Tipasa was originally a Phoenician trading post, but it became a Roman colony in the 2nd century AD. Later it became one of the most important Christian settlements in Northern Africa. With the coming of the Vandals and Christianity in 430, most of the inhabitants fled to Spain. With the coming of the Arabs in the 7th century, there was so little left that they called the place Tefassad, meaning "badly damaged". 

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Other World Heritage Sites in Algeria (on this website). Eventually refer to the UNESCO-listing, Algeria-section, for further information on the individual properties. 

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